Air Force Academy Professor Badge

The Air Force Academy Professor Badge is a military decoration of the United States Air Force which was first created in the 1980s. The badge recognizes those 23 Air Force colonels (and one brigadier general) who have been appointed by the Congress under US Code Title 10 as permanent professors and heads of academic departments, and as the Dean of Faculty, at the United States Air Force Academy in Colorado Springs, Colorado. The Air Force is the only branch of the United States armed forces to issue a badge for serving as a military academy professor.

The Air Force Academy Professor Badge is a permanent decoration.

United States Air Force portal

Famous quotes containing the words badge, professor, air, force and/or academy:

    Signor Antonio, many a time and oft
    In the Rialto you have rated me
    About my moneys and my usances.
    Still have I borne it with a patient shrug,
    For sufferance is the badge of all our tribe.
    You call me misbeliever, cutthroat dog,
    And spit upon my Jewish gaberdine,
    And all for use of that which is mine own.
    William Shakespeare (1564–1616)

    Members of the faculty, faculty members, students of Huxley and Huxley students. I guess that covers everything.
    S.J. Perelman, U.S. screenwriter, Bert Kalmar, Harry Ruby, and Norman Z. McLeod. Professor Quincy Adams Wagstaff (Groucho Marx)

    I wonder whether mankind could not get along without all these names, which keep increasing every day, and hour, and moment; till at the last the very air will be full of them; and even in a great plain, men will be breathing each other’s breath, owing to the vast multitude of words they use, that consume all the air, just as lamp-burners do gas.
    Herman Melville (1819–1891)

    Mathematics alone make us feel the limits of our intelligence. For we can always suppose in the case of an experiment that it is inexplicable because we don’t happen to have all the data. In mathematics we have all the data ... and yet we don’t understand. We always come back to the contemplation of our human wretchedness. What force is in relation to our will, the impenetrable opacity of mathematics is in relation to our intelligence.
    Simone Weil (1909–1943)

    I realized early on that the academy and the literary world alike—and I don’t think there really is a distinction between the two—are always dominated by fools, knaves, charlatans and bureaucrats. And that being the case, any human being, male or female, of whatever status, who has a voice of her or his own, is not going to be liked.
    Harold Bloom (b. 1930)