African American Registry

African American Registry (The Registry) is a non-profit educational resource for the learning community to supply teachers with the information, method, and materials to provide a solid educational background in black history and heritage, in the sciences, business, the arts, and all facets of academics and life.

The Registry is used to train teachers for content classroom use in all subjects employing educational companion products which support the website. Currently there are two types of yearly calendars, Black Heritage/365, and an education card game for children aged eight and older named, Fishing the Registry. The organization supports itself through product sales, and modest fees for presentations, workshops, seminars, training and programs. In September 2004 the agency received its 501(c)(3) status and now adds donations and foundation support towards its mission of teaching African-American heritage as American heritage in all subjects everyday through training, curriculum, technology and products.

Other articles related to "american":

The American Prisoner
... The American Prisoner is a novel written by Eden Phillpotts, published in America in 1904 and adapted into a film in 1929 ... an English woman who lives at Fox Tor farm, and an American captured during the American Revolutionary War and held at the prison at Princetown on Dartmoor ...

Famous quotes containing the words african american, african and/or american:

    The confirmation of Clarence Thomas, one of the most conservative voices to be added to the [Supreme] Court in recent memory, carries a sobering message for the African- American community.... As he begins to make his mark upon the lives of African Americans, we must acknowledge that his successful nomination is due in no small measure to the support he received from black Americans.
    Kimberly Crenshaw (b. 1959)

    A tanned skin is something more than respectable, and perhaps olive is a fitter color than white for a man,—a denizen of the woods. “The pale white man!” I do not wonder that the African pitied him.
    Henry David Thoreau (1817–1862)

    The train was crammed, the heat stifling. We feel out of sorts, but do not quite know if we are hungry or drowsy. But when we have fed and slept, life will regain its looks, and the American instruments will make music in the merry cafe described by our friend Lange. And then, sometime later, we die.
    Vladimir Nabokov (1899–1977)