African American Registry

African American Registry (The Registry) is a non-profit educational resource for the learning community to supply teachers with the information, method, and materials to provide a solid educational background in black history and heritage, in the sciences, business, the arts, and all facets of academics and life.

The Registry is used to train teachers for content classroom use in all subjects employing educational companion products which support the website. Currently there are two types of yearly calendars, Black Heritage/365, and an education card game for children aged eight and older named, Fishing the Registry. The organization supports itself through product sales, and modest fees for presentations, workshops, seminars, training and programs. In September 2004 the agency received its 501(c)(3) status and now adds donations and foundation support towards its mission of teaching African-American heritage as American heritage in all subjects everyday through training, curriculum, technology and products.

Other articles related to "american":

The American Prisoner
... The American Prisoner is a novel written by Eden Phillpotts, published in America in 1904 and adapted into a film in 1929 ... The story concerns an English woman who lives at Fox Tor farm, and an American captured during the American Revolutionary War and held at the prison at Princetown on Dartmoor ...

Famous quotes containing the words african american, african and/or american:

    I think it’s unfair for people to try to make successful blacks feel guilty for not feeling guilty.... We’re unique in that we’re not supposed to enjoy the things we’ve worked so hard for.
    Patricia Grayson, African American administrator. As quoted in Time magazine, p. 59 (March 13, 1989)

    The soldier here, as everywhere in Canada, appeared to be put forward, and by his best foot. They were in the proportion of the soldiers to the laborers in an African ant-hill.... On every prominent ledge you could see England’s hands holding the Canadas, and I judged from the redness of her knuckles that she would soon have to let go.
    Henry David Thoreau (1817–1862)

    Let’s face it. Let’s talk sense to the American people. Let’s tell them the truth, that there are no gains without pains, that we are now on the eve of great decisions, not easy decisions.
    Adlai Stevenson (1900–1965)