African American Registry

African American Registry (The Registry) is a non-profit educational resource for the learning community to supply teachers with the information, method, and materials to provide a solid educational background in black history and heritage, in the sciences, business, the arts, and all facets of academics and life.

The Registry is used to train teachers for content classroom use in all subjects employing educational companion products which support the website. Currently there are two types of yearly calendars, Black Heritage/365, and an education card game for children aged eight and older named, Fishing the Registry. The organization supports itself through product sales, and modest fees for presentations, workshops, seminars, training and programs. In September 2004 the agency received its 501(c)(3) status and now adds donations and foundation support towards its mission of teaching African-American heritage as American heritage in all subjects everyday through training, curriculum, technology and products.

Other articles related to "american":

The American Prisoner
... The American Prisoner is a novel written by Eden Phillpotts, published in America in 1904 and adapted into a film in 1929 ... The story concerns an English woman who lives at Fox Tor farm, and an American captured during the American Revolutionary War and held at the prison at Princetown on Dartmoor ...

Famous quotes containing the words african american, african and/or american:

    The confirmation of Clarence Thomas, one of the most conservative voices to be added to the [Supreme] Court in recent memory, carries a sobering message for the African- American community.... As he begins to make his mark upon the lives of African Americans, we must acknowledge that his successful nomination is due in no small measure to the support he received from black Americans.
    Kimberly Crenshaw (b. 1959)

    Exploitation and oppression is not a matter of race. It is the system, the apparatus of world-wide brigandage called imperialism, which made the Powers behave the way they did. I have no illusions on this score, nor do I believe that any Asian nation or African nation, in the same state of dominance, and with the same system of colonial profit-amassing and plunder, would have behaved otherwise.
    Han Suyin (b. 1917)

    The American adolescent, then, is faced, as are the adolescents of all countries who have entered or are entering the machine age, with the question: freedom from what and at what price? The American feels so rich in his opportunities for free expression that he often no longer knows what it is he is free from. Neither does he know where he is not free; he does not recognize his native autocrats when he sees them.
    Erik H. Erikson (1904–1994)