African American Appointed

Some articles on african, african american:

List Of African-American Firsts - 20th Century - 1990s
... 1990 First elected African-American governor Douglas Wilder (Democrat Virginia) (See also P ... Pinchback, 1872) First African American elected president of the Harvard Law Review Barack Obama (See also 2008, 2009) First African-American Miss USA Carole Gist First African-American ... John Singleton for Boyz n the Hood First African American to qualify for the Indianapolis 500 auto race Willy T ...

Famous quotes containing the words african american, appointed, african and/or american:

    We live in a highly industrialized society and every member of the Black nation must be as academically and technologically developed as possible. To wage a revolution, we need competent teachers, doctors, nurses, electronics experts, chemists, biologists, physicists, political scientists, and so on and so forth. Black women sitting at home reading bedtime stories to their children are just not going to make it.
    Frances Beale, African American feminist and civil rights activist. The Black Woman, ch. 14 (1970)

    The meeting, in spite of my attempt to decline it, appointed me one of the delegates, so that in getting Baker the nomination, I shall be “fixed” a good deal like a fellow who is made groomsman to the man what has cut him out, and is marrying his own dear “gal.”
    Abraham Lincoln (1809–1865)

    The sacrifice to Legba was completed; the Master of the Crossroads had taken the loas’ mysterious routes back to his native Guinea.
    Meanwhile, the feast continued. The peasants were forgetting their misery: dance and alcohol numbed them, carrying away their shipwrecked conscience in the unreal and shady regions where the savage madness of the African gods lay waiting.
    Jacques Roumain (1907–1945)

    Can you conceive what it is to native-born American women citizens, accustomed to the advantages of our schools, our churches and the mingling of our social life, to ask over and over again for so simple a thing as that “we, the people,” should mean women as well as men; that our Constitution should mean exactly what it says?
    Mary F. Eastman, U.S. suffragist. As quoted in History of Woman Suffrage, vol. 4 ch. 5, by Susan B. Anthony and Ida Husted Harper (1902)