Admission To The Bar in The United States

Admission to the bar in the United States is the granting of permission by a particular court system to a lawyer to practice law in that system. Each US state and similar jurisdiction (e.g. territories under federal control) has its own court system and sets its own rules for bar admission (or privilege to practice law), which can lead to different admission standards among states. In most cases, a person who is "admitted" to the bar is thereby a "member" of the particular bar.

In the canonical case, lawyers seeking admission must earn a Juris Doctor degree from a law school approved by the jurisdiction, and then pass a bar exam administered by it. Typically, there is also a character and fitness evaluation, which includes a background check. However there are exceptions to each of these requirements.

A lawyer who is admitted in one state is not automatically allowed to practice in any other. Some states have reciprocal agreements that allow attorneys from other states to practice without sitting for another full bar exam; such agreements differ significantly among the states.

Read more about Admission To The Bar In The United States:  Terminology, General Requirements For Admission, Tactical Considerations Regarding Admission in Multiple States, Types of State Bar Associations, Federal Courts, Apprenticeship Issue, Character and Fitness, Admission Formalities, Incidents of Admission

Other articles related to "admission to the bar in the united states, states, admission, state":

Admission To The Bar In The United States - Incidents of Admission
... permitted to practice law after being sworn in as an officer of the Court in most states, that means they may begin filing pleadings and appearing as ... Upon admission, a new lawyer is issued a certificate of admission, usually from the state's highest court, and a membership card attesting to admission ... Two states are exceptions to the general rule of admission by the state's highest court In New York, admission is granted by one of the state's four intermediate appellate courts ...

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