Administrative Division

An administrative division, subnational entity, or country subdivision is a portion of a country or other political division, established for the purpose of government. Administrative divisions are each granted a certain degree of autonomy, and are required to manage themselves through their own local governments. Countries are divided up into these smaller units to make managing their land and the affairs of their people easier. For example, a country may be divided into provinces, which in turn are divided into counties, which in turn may be divided in whole or in part into municipalities. These are only a few of the names given to administrative subdivisions; more examples are provided below.

Administrative divisions are conceptually separate from dependent territories, with the former being an integral part of the state and the other being only under some lesser form of control. However, the term "administrative division" can include dependent territories as well as accepted administrative divisions (for example, in geographical databases).

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Other articles related to "administrative division, division, administrative":

Administrative Division - Compare
... Sovereign state, a national or supra-national division ... Country, a national or supra-national division ... Empire, a supra-national division ...
County-equivalent
... areas not contained within the boundaries of any county when dividing the country for administrative purposes ... grouped into the following three classes An administrative division of a state, in certain states, which is comparable to a county as found in most states ... First, the administrative division directly below the state level is called a borough instead of a county, but is otherwise equivalent ...

Famous quotes containing the word division:

    Major [William] McKinley visited me. He is on a stumping tour.... I criticized the bloody-shirt course of the canvass. It seems to me to be bad “politics,” and of no use.... It is a stale issue. An increasing number of people are interested in good relations with the South.... Two ways are open to succeed in the South: 1. A division of the white voters. 2. Education of the ignorant. Bloody-shirt utterances prevent division.
    Rutherford Birchard Hayes (1822–1893)