Adenanthos

Adenanthos is an genus of Australian native shrubs in the flowering plant family Proteaceae. Variable in habit and leaf shape, it is the only genus in the family where solitary flowers are the norm. It was discovered in 1791, and formally published by Jacques Labillardière in 1805. The type species is Adenanthos cuneatus, and 33 species are recognised. The genus is placed in subfamily Proteoideae, and is held to be most closely related to several South African genera.

Endemic to Australia, its centre of diversity is southwest Western Australia, where 31 species occur. The other two species occur in South Australia and western Victoria (Australia). They are mainly pollinated by birds.

Read more about AdenanthosDistribution and Habitat, Ecology

Other articles related to "adenanthos":

Adenanthos Terminalis
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Adenanthos Sericeus - Taxonomy - Infrageneric Placement
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Adenanthos - Ecology
... A range of honeyeater species have been observed feeding at Adenanthos flowers, including Acanthorhynchus tenuirostris (Eastern Spinebill), Anthochaera ... and seemed unrelated to the amount of Adenanthos there yet these birds nonetheless fed at Adenanthos flowers ...
Adenanthos Obovatus - Ecology
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