Address

Address may refer to:

  • Address (geography), a code and abstract concept expressing a location on the Earth's surface (include also Postal address)
  • Public speaking, the process of speaking to a group of people in a structured, deliberate manner
  • Style (manner of address), a legal, official, or recognized title

Read more about Address:  Computing and Telecommunication

Other articles related to "address":

Three Address Code - Example
... i = 0 i < 10 ++i) { b = i*i } } The preceding C program, translated into three-address code, might look something like the following i = 0 assignment L1 ...
Address - Computing and Telecommunication
... Network address, various meanings An e-mail address, identifies an email box to which email messages are delivered A memory address, a data concept used at various levels by software ...
Osbourn Park High School - Address
... Osbourn Park's address is 8909 Euclid Ave, Manassas, Virginia. ...

Famous quotes containing the word address:

    If you have any information or evidence regarding the O.J. Simpson case, press 2 now. If you are an expert in fields relating to the O.J. Simpson case and would like to offer your services, press 3 now. If you would like the address where you can send a letter of support to O.J. Simpson, press 1 now. If you are seeking legal representation from the law offices of Robert L. Shapiro, press 4 now.
    Advertisement. Aired August 8, 1994 by Tom Snyder on TV station CNBC. Chicago Sun Times, p. 11 (July 24, 1994)

    Patience, to hear frivolous, impertinent, and unreasonable applications: with address enough to refuse, without offending; or, by your manner of granting, to double the obligation: dexterity enough to conceal a truth, without telling a lie: sagacity enough to read other people’s countenances: and serenity enough not to let them discover anything by yours; a seeming frankness, with a real reserve. These are the rudiments of a politician; the world must be your grammar.
    Philip Dormer Stanhope, 4th Earl Chesterfield (1694–1773)

    Self-confidence is apt to address itself to an imaginary dullness in others; as people who are well off speak in a cajoling tone to the poor.
    George Eliot [Mary Ann (or Marian)