Achieve Intended Consequences

Some articles on achieve intended consequences, achieve, intended consequences:

Action Research - Major Theories - Chris Argyris' Action Science
... Humans design their actions to achieve intended consequences and are governed by a set of environment variables ... When actions are designed to achieve the intended consequences and to suppress conflict about the governing variables, a single loop learning cycle usually ensues ... hand, when actions are taken, not only to achieve the intended consequences, but also to openly inquire about conflict and to possibly transform the governing ...
Chris Argyris - Action Science
... Human actions are designed to achieve intended consequences and governed by a set of environment variables ... When actions are designed to achieve the intended consequences and to suppress conflict about the governing variables, a single loop learning cycle usually ensues ... when actions are taken, not only to achieve the intended consequences, but also to openly inquire about conflict and to possibly transform the governing variables, both single loop ...

Famous quotes containing the words consequences, achieve and/or intended:

    The consequences of our actions grab us by the scruff of our necks, quite indifferent to our claim that we have “gotten better” in the meantime.
    Friedrich Nietzsche (1844–1900)

    We achieve “active” mastery over illness and death by delegating all responsibility for their management to physicians, and by exiling the sick and the dying to hospitals. But hospitals serve the convenience of staff not patients: we cannot be properly ill in a hospital, nor die in one decently; we can do so only among those who love and value us. The result is the institutionalized dehumanization of the ill, characteristic of our age.
    Thomas Szasz (b. 1920)

    Surrealism, n. Pure psychic automatism, by which it is intended to express, whether verbally or in writing, or in any other way, the real process of thought. Thought’s dictation, free from any control by the reason, independent of any aesthetic or moral preoccupation.
    André Breton (1896–1966)