Accent may refer to:

Read more about Accent:  Speech and Language, Music, Art, Computers, Other

Other articles related to "accent, accents":

Coatbridge Irish - Coatbridge Accent
... 'Celtic minded' Des Dillon wrote about the notion of a separate Coatbridge accent influenced by the successive waves of Irish immigrants into the town ... The Coatbridge accent has been categorised as generally less usage of the Scots tongue and the tendency to stress the 'a' vowel differently, e.g ...
Clinton Hostage Situation - Accent
... United States for 17 years, which could explain the southern accent, and other defenders of Clinton pointed out that the most commonly circulated audio and video clips of her "Southern" speech focused on a segment ... National Action Network, she once again temporarily adopted this accent ... three parts of the country and that her sometimes-Southern accent was a virtue ...
City Of Miami - Culture - Accent
... North American English regional phonology In Miami, a unique accent, commonly called the "Miami accent", is widely spoken ... It is very similar to accents in the Northeast, but contains a rhythm and pronunciation heavily influenced by Spanish ...
Examples of Linguistic Discrimination - In The United States - Hispanic Americans and Linguicism
... of the United States, a person who has a strong Mexican accent and uses only simple English words may be thought of as poor, poorly educated, and possibly an illegal immigrant by many of the ... However, if the same person has a diluted accent or no noticeable accent at all and can use a myriad of words in complex sentences, they are likely to be perceived as more successful, better educated ...
Accent - Other
... Aeros Accent, a paraglider Hyundai Accent, car produced by Hyundai Motor Company Accent Records, a record label ACCENT Speakers Bureau, a student-run organization at the ...

Famous quotes containing the word accent:

    The accent of a man’s native country remains in his mind and his heart, as it does in his speech.
    François, Duc De La Rochefoucauld (1613–1680)

    I lost my ridiculous accent without acquiring another
    John Ashbery (b. 1927)

    An accent mark, perhaps, instead of a whole western accent—a point of punctuation rather than a uniform twang. That is how it should be worn: as a quiet point of character reference, an apt phrase of sartorial allusion—macho, sotto voce.
    Phil Patton (b. 1953)