Academic Regalia of Harvard University

Academic Regalia Of Harvard University

As the oldest college in the United States, Harvard University has a long tradition of academic dress. Harvard gown facings bear crow's-feet emblems near the yoke, a symbol unique to Harvard, made from flat braid in colours distinctive of the wearer's qualification or degree. Crow's-feet are double for earned degrees, and triple for honorary degrees.

Read more about Academic Regalia Of Harvard University:  History of Harvard Academic Dress

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Academic Regalia Of Harvard University - The Ceremony - Officials At Commencement
... Harvard aides and marshals, at commencement, wear black top hats, white four-in-hand ties and cutaway coats for men, and white dresses and crimson sashes for women ... subject of controversy, such as the occasion, printed on June 10, 1970 in The Harvard Crimson, when the Governor of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts reportedly appeared ... When University marshals objected to his costume, the story goes, Curley whipped out a copy of the Statutes of the Massachusetts Bay Colony which prescribed proper dress for the ...

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