Academic Progress Rate

The Academic Progress Rate, sometimes also known as Academic Performance Rating

The NCAA defines The Academic Progress Rate as:

The Academic Progress Rate (APR) is a term-by-term measure of eligibility and retention for Division I student-athletes that was developed as an early indicator of eventual graduation rates.

Read more about Academic Progress RateBackground, Functions, Measurement, Sanctions, Reform, Adjustments, Potential Misinterpretations

Other articles related to "academic progress rate, rates, rate, academic":

Academic Progress Rate - Potential Misinterpretations
... unless it is viewed alongside the graduation rates for non athletes at the institution ... However, if the graduation rate for non-athletes is also 50% then the low graduation rate for the athletes is not a student-athlete problem, but a university wide problem ... compare APR scores across universities because the academic rigors between universities differ ...

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