Academic Library Directors

Some articles on library, academic library directors, directors, academic, library directors, academic library:

Joplin, Missouri - Education - Library
... Joplin is served by the Joplin Public Library, which is situated on Main Street between the intersections of 3rd and 4th Streets ... Built in 1981, the current library sits on the historic location of Joplin's most famous landmark, the Connor Hotel, which came crashing down in 1978, one day before scheduled demolition ...
Zachęta - Library
... The Zachęta library includes catalogues about Polish artists who are working in Poland and abroad, about foreign artists who are working in Poland as well as catalogues about certain cycles of exhibitions ...
Library - Islam
... In Aleppo, for example, the largest and probably the oldest mosque library, the Sufiya, located at the city's Grand Umayyad Mosque, contained a large book collection of which 10,000 volumes were reportedly ...
Westminster, Massachusetts - Library
... The Westminster Town Library was established in 1868 ... spent 2.97% ($518,171) of its budget on its public library—some $70 per person ...
Connecticut Council Of Academic Library Directors
... The Connecticut Council of Academic Library Directors is a Connecticut-wide body founded in 1993 its members are directors of academic libraries in Connecticut ... applying for grants collectively, To serve as a means of communication among Connecticut library directors, and To make recommendations and represent the point of view of Connecticut academic library ...

Famous quotes containing the words academic and/or library:

    Being in a family is like being in a play. Each birth order position is like a different part in a play, with distinct and separate characteristics for each part. Therefore, if one sibling has already filled a part, such as the good child, other siblings may feel they have to find other parts to play, such as rebellious child, academic child, athletic child, social child, and so on.
    Jane Nelson (20th century)

    Our civilization has decided ... that determining the guilt or innocence of men is a thing too important to be trusted to trained men.... When it wants a library catalogued, or the solar system discovered, or any trifle of that kind, it uses up its specialists. But when it wishes anything done which is really serious, it collects twelve of the ordinary men standing round. The same thing was done, if I remember right, by the Founder of Christianity.
    Gilbert Keith Chesterton (1874–1936)