Academic Dress of The University of Cambridge

Academic Dress Of The University Of Cambridge

The University of Cambridge has a long tradition of academic dress, which it traditionally refers to as academical dress (though academic dress is used here for consistency with other articles on Wikipedia). Almost every degree which is awarded by the University has its own distinct gown in addition to having its own hood. Undergraduates wear college gowns which have subtle differences enabling the wearer's college to be determined. Academic dress is worn quite often in Cambridge on formal, and sometimes informal, occasions, and there are a number of rules and customs governing when and how it is worn. Black gowns (undress) are worn at less formal events, while on special days (such as the days of General Admission to Degrees) full academical dress is worn, consisting of gown, hood and headdress with Doctors in festal dress. The University's officials also have ancient forms of academic dress, unique to the University.

Read more about Academic Dress Of The University Of CambridgeWhen Academic Dress Is Worn, Components of Cambridge Academic Dress

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