Aberdeen Railway Station

Aberdeen railway station is the main railway station in Aberdeen, Scotland. It is the busiest railway station in Scotland north of the major cities of Glasgow and Edinburgh. It is located on Guild Street in the city centre, next to Union Square.

The station is managed by ScotRail, part of global transportation company FirstGroup which has its headquarters in Aberdeen. Inter-city, regional, local and sleeper train services are provided to all parts of Great Britain by ScotRail, East Coast and CrossCountry.

Read more about Aberdeen Railway StationRail Services and Train Operators

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Famous quotes containing the words station and/or railway:

    [T]here is no situation so deplorable ... as that of a gentlewoman in real poverty.... Birth, family, and education become misfortunes when we cannot attain some means of supporting ourselves in the station they throw us into. Our friends and former acquaintances look on it as a disgrace to own us.... If we were to attempt getting our living by any trade, people in that station would think we were endeavoring to take their bread out of their mouths.
    Sarah Fielding (1710–1768)

    Her personality had an architectonic quality; I think of her when I see some of the great London railway termini, especially St. Pancras, with its soot and turrets, and she overshadowed her own daughters, whom she did not understand—my mother, who liked things to be nice; my dotty aunt. But my mother had not the strength to put even some physical distance between them, let alone keep the old monster at emotional arm’s length.
    Angela Carter (1940–1992)