59th World Science Fiction Convention

59th World Science Fiction Convention

The Millennium Philcon was the 59th World Science Fiction Convention, held from August 30 to September 3, 2001 at the Pennsylvania Convention Center & Philadelphia Marriott Hotel in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA.

Most commentators mentioned the titanic size of the convention center. Darrell Schweitzer said of it, "Imagine a convention held in a zeppelin hangar -- designed for multiple zeppelins -- and you will begin to get the idea ... enough airspace to fly a small plane indoors."

Read more about 59th World Science Fiction Convention:  Guests of Honor, Other Program Participants, Attendance, About The Convention, Site Selection

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59th World Science Fiction Convention - Site Selection
... Boston won the bid for the 62nd World Science Fiction Convention to be held in 2004. ...

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