52nd (Oxfordshire) Regiment of Foot

The 52nd (Oxfordshire) Regiment of Foot was a light infantry regiment of the British Army throughout much of the 18th and 19th centuries. The regiment first saw active service during the American War of Independence, and were posted to India during the Anglo-Mysore Wars. During the Napoleonic Wars, the 52nd were part of the Light Division, and were present at most of the major battles of the Peninsula campaign, becoming one of the most celebrated regiments, described by Sir William Napier as "a regiment never surpassed in arms since arms were first borne by men". They had the largest British battalion at Waterloo, 1815, where they formed part of the final charge against Napoleon's Imperial Guard. They were also involved in various campaigns in India.

The regiment was raised as a line regiment in 1755 and numbered as the "54th Foot"; they were renumbered as the "52nd Regiment of Foot" in 1757. In 1781, the regional designation "52nd (Oxfordshire) Regiment of Foot" was given, and in 1803 the regiment was the first regular British Army regiment to be designated "Light Infantry". In 1881 the regiment was merged with the 43rd (Monmouthshire) Regiment of Foot to become the regiment later known as the Oxfordshire and Buckinghamshire Light Infantry.

Read more about 52nd (Oxfordshire) Regiment Of Foot:  Regimental Structure, Light Infantry, Colours and Honours, Uniform and Equipment, Legacy

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52nd (Oxfordshire) Regiment Of Foot - Legacy
... Despite its continual merging with other units from 1881, the legacy of the 52ndremains ... Many of the 52nds battle honours are represented on the Belt Badge of The Rifles (being a rifle regiment The Rifles do not carry colours) ... Various museums record the actions of the 52ndand hold collections of artifacts and memorabilia, including the Royal Green Jackets Museum, and the Soldiers of OxfordshireTrust, whose archives ...

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