1992 Consensus

The 1992 Consensus or Consensus of 1992 is was the outcome of a meeting in 1992 between the semi-official representatives of the People's Republic of China (PRC) in mainland China and the Republic of China (ROC) in Taiwan. The Consensus, as described by some observers, is that, on the subject of the "One China principle", both sides recognise there is only one China - both mainland China and Taiwan belong to the same China, but both sides agree to verbally express the meaning of that one China according to their own individual definition.

The PRC's position is that there is one, undivided sovereignty of China, and that the PRC is the sole legitimate representative of that sovereignty. The ROC's position is that there is one, undivided sovereignty of China, and that the ROC is the sole legitimate representative of that sovereignty. The 1992 Consensus is the current policy of both the governments of the ROC and the PRC.

Read more about 1992 Consensus:  Historic Background of The Term, 21st-century Developments

Other articles related to "1992 consensus, 1992":

1992 Consensus - 21st-century Developments
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